valley of clare

In my small, abundant corner of the world, I’ve been living my best life. Covid is still a strong threat to society and Victoria has recently gone into a second wave of lockdown. In hope of avoiding a breakout in South Australia, some precautions have been put back in place, but hopefully it doesn’t go any further. Please know that you are in my prayers and if anyone needs to talk or vent, my eyes, ears and inbox are open.

In other news, Jord and I headed north to the lovely valley of Clare. Jord’s dad, Andrew, lives there with his partner, Karen, on a property buried between the vines. Jordan offered some laborious stonemason style hours on the cottage that they are renovating, so we made a trip of it and stayed overnight.

Whilst they were putting in their blood and sweat, I wandered off, camera in hand, to explore the property and admire the sunset. They worked into the night, completing the project of the day, and came inside, tummy grumbling. Karen cooked us a healthy meal, as we enjoyed an array of local alcoholic beverages.

As the guest bedroom was taken, we retired to the glamping tent they had set up outside. Five blankets, wooly socks and ‘hot-water-bottle-Jord‘ couldn’t possibly help me freezing to my core. The full moon was also very bright and not much sleep was had. I woke up early the next morning, finally warm and cosy, but had to chuck some shoes on and pack up my bags. After a kiwi fruit and some cornflakes, Karen joined me for a slow and steady yoga flow by ‘Yoga with Adriene‘.

By lunch, we were off, but not before stopping by Red Grape Bakery in Clare. I got a curry pie and a pumpkin, spinach and ricotta sausage roll. We took our paper bagged goods on a walk to Neagles Rock Lookout and enjoyed the view before our drive home; thanks for having us!

blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures

If I were to narrow it down to the most valuable thing that I learnt from our working holiday in Whistler, it would be gratitude. Although I had some understanding of what gratitude was, I had never truly practiced it.

Gratitude: noun [mass noun]
the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness

When Jordan and I arrived home, I felt overwhelmed. The sincere love and support we received from family was so special. I had a new appreciation for where we lived and the home that we had created. We came home healthy despite travelling through the peak of Covid-19 and stayed safe during our trips up the mountains. We grew as individuals and, for that, our relationship is stronger than ever. We overcame obstacles and challenges that were thrown our way and I wouldn’t change anything about our trip, for it has made me the person I am today, and for that, I am blessed.

Part 3/3 – March 2020

go where you feel most alive

In the last twenty-four hours, I feel like I’ve entered a new chapter of my life, with feelings of relief and excitement. A chapter of movement, gratitude, travel and new goals astir. I’ve felt The travel bug growing exponentially in my belly and a strong craving for adventure; watch this space.

Part 2/3 – the first couple months of 2020

alta lake + 23

Alike most, I am well and truly into the swing of self isolation and buying everything that pops up on my Instagram ads; obviously because I need it and I can’t possibly live without. The only time that I am not at home is when I go to the grocery store for an “adventure”. To be honest, I don’t not like it. After getting over the fact that I had to spend my twenty third birthday in isolation, I’ve developed a nice little routine and I’ve had time to do things that I enjoy.

I get up at about 7.30am and have a fuelling snack whilst logging some feelings, goals for the day and gratitude. With this perspective, I then do my workout. I’ve been using the ‘Keep it Cleaner’ app as a motivational tool to get up and get moving, and follow this with a weights program. Jordan already had a lot of equipment from when he was younger that we were able to dust off and start flingin’ around. Karen, my mother in law, has also been consistently coming down to the deck to join in the workouts with me. Karen’s involvement and interest has kept me driven and accountable.

Breakfast is next on the list and is arguably my favourite time of the day. I’m talking fried eggs, wholemeal bread, cheese and sautéed onion, spinach, mushrooms and broccoli with moroccan seasoning, and some smokey bbq sauce on the side. Some home made kombucha and most likely a coffee, accompanied by a comfy couch and some comedy or motivational tv show on Netflix. A complete recipe for the best breakfast and what I’d be requesting as my last meal on death row.

That’s my morning. It’s usually followed by some tidying, reading, stretching, cooking/baking, going for a walk, listening to a podcast, editing photos, playing music, watching some tv and, of course, scrolling through Instagram; because that weird shaving butter, discounted leggings and fruit enzyme face mask ain’t gon’ buy themselves.

For the moment, I’m feeling content, whole and aware of my thoughts and feelings. I’m wanting to double down on my night routine, to aim for better quality sleep and encourage more productiveness the following day. I’m making sure the weekend is the weekend by relaxing to the max on ‘doona days’ with a couple drinks and indulgent foods. It’s been nice looking forward to something other than a trip to the grocery store.

On another note, I’ve been looking at some photos taken in the last week we were in Whistler and realised that I hadn’t yet posted them. We had just been laid off and, day by day, the village became a ghost town. Everyone that worked for the mountain was hanging out by the grocery/liquor store or down at Alta lake, so we headed down with a couple of subs and ciders to check out the frozen lake and enjoy the sunshine.

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italy / day fourteen / roma / nettuno

Snag some breakfast and we are out the door and on a train to Nettuno. Home to the one and only attraction, an American Military Memorial, that Pop had really wanted to visit. A short walk from the station and a few directions from the locals and we had reached the memorial. I grabbed some olives at a small stall to snack on.

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The memorial was actually stunning. I didn’t really know what to expect, but it wasn’t this. The gardens were beautifully kept and thousands of white marble crosses stretched to the sky, row after row. We wandered the paths on this sunny and peaceful day and I remember watching Pop, so entranced by the place. It was really nice to see.

There was a visitor centre that was absolutely deserted, but full of photos, maps and information on how the Americans infiltrated Sicily and basically won the war.

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After a light snack we then caught the train another stop to Anzio. Pop said there was an English Cemetery there, but unfortunately, we weren’t able to locate it. We actually ended up at a war museum, that was full of artefacts, newspaper clippings, posters and gear; the place was overflowing with history.

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Later on that evening, we freshened up at the hotel, then watched an amazing concert at Saint Paul’ Cathedral, Barroque verse Vivaldi. The music filled the space, enveloping us in the warm sounds. I really enjoyed the second half, as it was mainly Vivaldi and I knew many of the compositions. Even Jordan knew a couple (one of the songs is used as the theme song to Chefs Table!)

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italy / day thirteen / roma

Woke up and got straight into a HIIT workout on the small balcony of our hotel room, involving body weight exercises like squats and push ups. Managed to actually get up a good sweat, though super missing going to the gym.

Scheduled in today was a trip to the Borghese Gallery, as Pop had already organised us tickets 6 weeks prior. Pop knew the tickets sell out very quickly and have to be booked in advance, as it is unlikely you will have the opportunity to purchase them at the door. Thankfully he snapped some up for us to visit the gallery at 1pm. We took a train to Spagna where we took the Park exit and made our way to the gallery to check in, as you need to be there one hour prior. This gave us some time to wander around the lively parklands in the middle of the city. Everything was so green and the air was so fresh. There was lots of tourists, buskers, painters, dogs, runners and so many children. Lots of people had hired these 2/4 seater bicycle carts and were riding them on the wide paths around the park, under the trees.

Borghese Gallery was amazing. The once Villa, now a widely renowned tourist attraction, home to the Borghese collection of paintings, sculptures and antiquities. You’re given a two hour time frame to gaze in awe at the ceilings and explore the many rooms in this mansion. Although you are shuffling along with the crowd, it is a small price to pay for the beauty that beholds this place. Many of my favourite paintings/sculptures are housed in this very spot.

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We walked back in the direction of the train station via the city, stumbling upon the Spanish Steps. We spent the rest of the day wandering the city, down to Vatican City, Castello D’angelo, along the river to Tiber Island, where we got a sweet treat of Tiramisu gelato. We kept walking until we wound up at Circo Massimo train station and headed on home. We had dinner at a restaurant around the corner from our hotel.

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italy / day eleven / roma

I sneakily smuggled away some pastries for the road after our last breakfast at Corte de Francesi. We took a taxi to Brindisi airport (I swear they were going at least 140km/h), because we were flying past all the other cars. We checked in our baggage and boarded a plane to Roma! A bus trip to Termini and a short walk, and we were at what would be our hotel for the next six days, Alpi Hotel.

As soon as we arrive, Pop takes a nasty tumble on some of the steps in the hotel and bumps his head (which we later found out that he broke a couple ribs and ended up getting pneumonia; what a bloody trooper!). Not the best start, but we patch things up with a band aid and some ruby red strawberries, left by hotel staff with compliments, and continue on with our day. Obviously, we are very hungry again and grab some super tasty focaccias (Pizza Shop 341 SNC), which filled a good hole for the next kilometre.

Checking out the city on foot, we end up at the Trevi Fountain. It was amazing, but the place was crowded with so many tourists and people trying to sell stuff to you, that we continued on pretty quickly. Though, we did stop into an awesome store that let you build your own magnum ice cream; which of course we tried.

We moved on from the square and headed for the Palazzo Doria Pamphilj, an old palace gallery and home, partially open to the public, in the heart of the city. We had accidentally stumbled on to this magnificent place on our previous visit to Rome. We got some tickets and a portable handset guide, and wandered through the many rooms of the palace, admiring the incredible paintings that filled the ceilings and intricately detailed floors, not to mention the hundreds of artworks strung up through the gallery.

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We finished our day with a special dinner at L’eau Vive, a restaurant completely run by Carmelite nuns, to celebrate our first night in Rome. We started with asparagus and leek soup, then I had lamb chops with tomato, beans and this lovely creamy pepper and thyme sauce for main.

italy / day ten / otranto / gallipoli

Started the day off with a great spread in the old tannery, then made our plan of attack for the day. We only had one day but we wanted to fit in the equivalent of two day trips. The lady at the reception wished us well, even though I’m sure she didn’t believe in us. Via train, we travelled to Otranto, a village on the coast. A short walk from the station through the suburbs and the path spits you out right in front of the most magical, crystal clear turquoise waters; extremely inviting for an afternoon dip.

 

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We walked along the esplanade admiring the boats and watching the little fishies swim around the rocks. We temporarily lost Pop for a bit and went on a search. Lots of little shops lined the narrow streets, selling touristy gizmos and local knick knacks. We eventually found Pop after scouting out the colourful streets.

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We take a brisk walk back to the station to catch the next train back to Maglie, to then go to Gallipoli, in the opposite direction. This worked well for the most part, until a heard of teenage kids suddenly appear on the platform and pile into the same little carriage of a train, heading to the same destination as us. Luckily they all got off about half way through and we could stretch our legs a little more.

 

At the final stop, the driver pointed us in the direction of the older town, down to the port. Although the salty wind whistled up the main road and it was much chillier, we couldn’t go past this ginormous gelateria. As we approached, the old town could be seen clearly as the mainland was separated by a bridge and a castle stood tall and proud, just to the left. The receptionist had given us some free tickets to actually go inside, which ended up being really cool.

 

 

Passing through the cobbled streets, we tried some pistachio liqueur and a traditional biscuit, taralli. I found this beautiful olive oil bottle that I bought to use in our new house. A leisurely walk to the point at the edge of the town, we grabbed some dinner and sat outside overlooking the ocean as the sun went down. Pasta and fish was on the menu.

 

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On the way back to the station, I had neglected to realise that the trip back to Maglie was actually only half way by train and the other half by bus; which we spent another thirty minutes waiting for. Whilst we waited for the bus, very late at night in the middle of nowhere with very little people around, we got chatting to a friendly, frizzy haired guy holding a guitar and his friend. Turns out he was a pretty serious 16 year old musician, with big dreams. I participated in the music jargon and whipped out a jazz tune. It was really fun.

 

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italy / day nine / maglie

Jord and I fit in another workout at the awesome hotel gym, then fill up at breakfast before some more train travel. Maglie was the destination, but we stopped off in Lecce on the way wanting to explore the town. Our bags went into a storage locker not too far from the train station and we walked into town. The town was full of gorgeous old sandstone coloured buildings and plenty of people. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to explore inside any of the buildings because most things were closed from 12.30pm til 4pm, which is exactly the time that we were there – of course! So we had a look around but decided to continue on to Maglie. We got some Gelato first though!

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Once in Maglie, we talked to some locals at the station and they directed us to our hotel, Corte dei Francesi. Once a tannery back in the day, now transformed into a very comfortable series of room and communal dining area, elegantly decorated in a  bohemian chic style. We dropped our bags off and went for a stroll around the town.

I noticed there wasn’t many kids, the place was quite lively and there was an abundance of shops, everything from food and wine, to high end shopping. I was intrigued in a little bottle shop where an array of oak barrels full of wine, lined the entirety of one wall. The man working there ran us through a wine tasting, talking to us about the local varietals. From memory, we tasted Negroamaro, Malvasia and Verdeca.

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After some thoughtful consideration, we went back to the hotel after having no luck finding somewhere to eat. The kind receptionist gave us some recommendations and made a booking for us. We were the only ones in the restaurant for most of the dinner as they had accepted us earlier than their opening time; as everyone eats dinner so late! I tried a dessert called Spumoni, it was delish!

 

italy / day eight / matera

After all the pasta and breads, olive oil and wine, I was so excited to get to the well equiped hotel gym downstairs, that I barely slept! Jordan and I headed down to basement and I had a really good arms session. We had a quick shower and then enjoyed a westernised style breakfast buffet, whilst going over plans for the day. Today we were going to Matera, in the small region of Basilicata, approximately an hour, by train, out of Bari. The ancient neighbourhood, namely Sassi, are a series of caverns carved out of limestone, nestled in a small canyon.

On arrival, we picked up a map of the Sassi and a punnet of strawberries for our journey. We soon made sense of the layout, breaking it up into a distinct New Town, Old Town, and in my opinion, Very Old Town. The train station is higher up and you could basically follow any of the streets down towards the main square. From there, it’s more of a wander and get lost kind of situation. I loved this, as the small number of tourists that were there just dispersed and you were solely there to immerse yourself in the seemingly small, but literally huge Sassi.

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Mid afternoon refuel of pizza bread and fruit smoothie, and we were back exploring the Sassi. Closer to the ravine, deeper into the town, there were many empty grottoes ready for me to explore; semi fenced off but not really.

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After farewelling the enchanting Matera, we ate at one of the only eateries we could find in Bari, Tankard Gastropub. We put some washing on at the laundromat across the road, whilst eating some delicious ribs and salad. The person manning the venue was lovely and so helpful with the menu, even though he couldn’t speak a drop of english. It was one of the tastiest meals we had.

To this day, Matera is one of the most incredible, absolutely magical places I’ve ever been and is seriously underrated. If you’re going to Italy and not sure whether to go, as it is a bit out of the way, I’m telling you now, it is 110% worth it.