italy / day six / siracusa

A big day planned with a serious amount of walking. We walk down to the island, Ortigia, to checkout some markets and the castle perched on the coast that was closed the other day. The markets were coloured with spices and flowers, we tried some cheese and honey, then towards the castle. When we got to the castle, we bought some tickets and had a look around, but they neglected to tell us that the actual castle was closed for renovations, so there wasn’t much to see. It was still a lovely morning wandering the markets.

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Happy with our exploring of Ortigia, we set out on a long walk across Siracusa towards the archeological park of ancient Neapolis; roughly about forty five minutes. On the way, a tourist asked me, of all people, where the train station was. Through our significant mapping of the area and my great sense of direction (ha!) I was able to advise accordingly.

Three main sites scatter Neapolis; the Greek Theatre, Roman Amphitheatre and the Ear of Dionysius. These incredible sites make up some of the best ruins I have seen in Italy. We walked through the park and up some stairs following a path that opened up at the top of the Greek Theatre. On the left, many stairs/seats directing down onto a makeshift wooden stage, soon to be used for a production, and on the right, little niches found themselves in the semi circle of stone – of course we explored every one of them!

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We stumbled onto our next stop, following a shady path outlined by luscious green trees and old wooden fencing; The Ear of Dionysius, of which was nicknamed by Caravaggio. Dionysius I was a tyrant whom ruled from 405-367 BC. I later learnt that a local legend suggested that he used this cave as a prison, and its acoustics, to spy on his captives, thus the name. I found this place absolutely magical. The way you could whisper at one end and hear it at the other was fascinating. I couldn’t help myself and stayed for a short Natalie Cole tune; Orange Coloured Sky – the acoustics were just too good.

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A short walk and we were wandering around the Roman Amphitheatre. There was a heap of information boards scattered around the theatre describing what things were and what they were used for. The rest of the park lacked this, so it was good to get some insight whilst we were there, rather than later. I found the Roman Amphitheatre to be beguiling, imagining the gladiator fights that would have taken place.

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A friendly waiter and some ham and cheese toasties later, and we’re off to some nearby catacombs, San Giovanni. We bought a couple tickets and waited patiently for the next tour to start. The guide was very informative and took us through the main sections of the catacombs as well as the church and crypt. It was much colder down in the catacombs and really eerie, especially thinking about how the majority of the tunnels were underneath the city of Siracusa.

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A leisurely walk back to the vicinity of our hotel where we head straight to a pub called ‘Hops’. We munch on some well earned burgers; ended up costing us a hefty $70 for our cravings – I think we will be sticking to pizzas and pastas from now on.

italy / day two / taormina

After a satisfying spread at Catania Hotel and trying to order Pop something similar to a flat white, we caught a taxi to the station and jumped on a train to Taormina. A Sicilian lady attempted to talk to us the entire way; I was surprised at how much I could understand. As we approached our destination, the terrain started to become a lot more mountainous and we started to see a lot of towns scattered along the cliffs. To reach Taormina, we needed to get off the train and catch a bus up to the town. The kind Sicilian lady waited with us, making sure we got on the right bus, and then walked the opposite way. We stumbled onto the crazy packed bus with our luggage and somehow found some seats at the very back. The bus ride was somewhat scary. The road up to the town centre was narrow and steep, and it expertly curved around the handles of the mountain. The bus took up majority of the road and would constantly cut off other vehicles coming the opposite way, especially on the corners. And then there were all the cars that were parked on the road; seriously mad. Once we reached the bus station in Taormina, we took a short walk to our accomodation, Sirius Hotel. Checked in, dumped our luggage, freshened up and then we headed out to explore.

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Taormina was magical; the cobbled streets and old buildings splashed with orange and pink hues, the views out to sea and the picturesque landscape of the towns below and Mt Etna, this town was full of life. After grabbing a bite to eat and people watching, we had plenty of daylight to spare, and ventured to the ancient Greek theatre of Taormina (Teatro Greco). Perfectly perched on the mountainside of Taormina, lay this extraordinary place. Instead of being overcrowded like some archaeological sites, there was barely a soul. We breathed in the coastal fresh air, as we explored the miraculous ruins.

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The ancient Greek Theatre of Taormina

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After a caramel gelato and some more wandering through the streets, we sat down for an early dinner off the main thoroughfare. For our first dinner all together, we stuck to the classics and warmed up with tomato soup, followed by carbonara and lasagne for main course. Pop enjoyed some minestrone. On the way home, we picked up some juicy, bright red strawberries to munch on for dessert.